What We Believe

At Red Door Church we recently approved a Statement of Faith that explains in some details where our church stands on a host of important spiritual issues. That Statement is posted in its entirety here in an easy to navigate format for your convenience. Please email our church leadership if you have any questions. Thank you for showing interest in our church!

Statement of Faith
Red Door Church 2017

SECTION I

Why have a statement of faith?

There are several reasons why the church has found creeds helpful throughout its history, dating back all the way to the time of the apostles. Creeds or statements of faith:

  1. summarize our beliefs,
  2. clarify and avoid confusion,
  3. protect our church from false teaching,
  4. help us adhere to the historic faith delivered “once for all”.
  5. help both visitors and seekers understand where we stand on various important theological and social issues.

Our Church History

Red Door Church is formally associated with the United Methodist Church (UMC) and the United Church of Christ (UCC). Our federated status (a single church with membership in multiple denominations) is the result of a merger which began in the 1920s and was officially contracted in the 1970s.

Four Concentric Circles

At Red Door Church we have four concentric circles which help us to define and understand the importance of certain beliefs we hold and their relationship to one another. The innermost circle, CORE, represents what is most important in the Christian life. It is the “sun” around which all the “planets” of the Christian worldview and life revolve. It is followed by CONFESSIONS, which are summaries of historic Christian teaching and practice. The first two circles are what we call the ESSENTIALS, that is, those beliefs that are essential for church membership and baptism. (A fuller statement of membership can be found at the end of this document.)

The Inner Circle of Beliefs – The Core

Faith in Jesus Christ is the center of Christian faith.

But what does it mean to believe in Jesus Christ?

The Second Circle of Beliefs – The Confessions

The next concentric circle is labeled “confessions.” Confessions are the basic truths of our faith that the church has embraced and proclaimed throughout the twenty centuries of Christian history. Some writers call the confessions the “ancient Christian consensus.”

The Third Circle of Beliefs – Our Convictions

These differences often divide one believer or group of believers from others. The circle marked “convictions” is designated “non-essential,” but it is more important than the circle marked “conscience.”

The Fourth Circle of Beliefs – Conscience

The final circle, the outermost one, is “conscience.” These are matters on which Christians express personal opinions on a variety of moral and social issues that the Bible does not speak directly to. Most Christians would argue that their opinions in this circle are compatible with the Bible, but the Bible does not give a clear, consistent answer on these questions.

SECTION II

Doctrine and Life

We at Red Door believe that the bible communicates authoritatively not only what we ought to believe, but also how we ought to live.

The scriptures teach that Christians should “watch your life and doctrine closely.” The bible makes no division between faith and practice and doctrine and life. These two arenas are not mutually exclusive. What we believe influences how we live, and how we live is based on what we believe.

Doctrine

Here at Red Door Church we accept the Apostle’s Creed as a clear and concise statement of Christian belief. The Apostle’s Creed states:

Life

Ancient confessions regarding Christian living are harder to come across outside of the bible. The main reason for this is because the Christian way of life was obvious, clear, and undisputed until recent history.

Official Statements of the United Methodist Church (UMC) and Other Methodist Organizations

In the United Methodist Church’s Book of Discipline we agree with paragraph 304.3 which says: “The practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching.”